Pop Quiz with Texas A&M 12th Man Deep Snapper Connor Choate | Soccer

Texas A&M’s Connor Choate is entering his second season as the team’s 12th man. While playing deep snapper for the Aggies, he had more athletic roots at Coppell, playing lacrosse before taking on specialist football duties. He sat down with Eagle Sportswriter Travis L. Brown will take the Game Day pop quiz this week.

Q: What was fall camp like?

A: It’s been a long time. This offseason felt longer than the others. I feel like Spring Ball went very slowly, so it’s going to be fun to be in front of the fans at Kyle Field. Really looking forward to it. I know the team is too.






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Q: Going into year two as a 12th man, how has your life changed from last season?

A: I’m definitely going from nobody really knowing who the long snapper is to a lot of people know who I am now… it’s definitely different, but I’m very lucky and blessed to be in this position I’m in. find, and I feel like last year it was a little overwhelming at times, but I feel like I’m a little more grounded and in control now.

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Q: What’s the craziest interaction you’ve had on campus?

A: I was actually crossing [the team tunnel at Kyle Field] after a game last year, and I had a guy ask me to sign both his shoes… just his shoes [on the inside panel].

Q: Did you have any mistakes while carrying the flag last year while leading the team on the field?

A: Maybe it was against Prairie View. He may have slipped at some point, but I caught him. It looks great, and the flag can easily [hit the crossbar]. When we were doing practice runs last year, I kept hitting the goal post. They were like, okay, man, we better hope you don’t hit him. I learned to keep it until you’ve passed the basket.

Q: How did you get into lacrosse and what was the sport like in high school?

A: Lacrosse was my first sport that I played competitively on a real team. It started with my brother. My brother played lacrosse. He put me in. We would always get our sticks out and play a little catch-up and hit each other with it. Some of my fondest memories in high school were playing lacrosse and playing with that team because that’s when I was able to prove I was a real athlete in the spring. I wasn’t just breaking the ball. I could say, hey, guys, I can run. I can throw. I can shoot.

Q: What position did you play?

A: I played long stick [midfield].

Q: Are there any other former lacrosse players on the A&M football team?

A: No, but I’ll tell you one that would be really nice: [freshman wide receiver] Evan Stewart. He would be the best player. If he starts picking up a lacrosse stick, some people in Major League Lacrosse are going to be out of a job.

Q: Coming out of fall camp, what are you most excited about with this team?

A: Can’t wait to watch [freshman defensive lineman] Shemar Stewart and Evan Stewart and also get to see how the offense merges with Haynes [King].

Q: So you’re big on the Stewarts?

A: I’m a Stewart guy, definitely. Both sides of the ball. Looking forward to attack and see what they can do there. Also [defensive coordinator DJ Durkin] and see what he has up his sleeve.

Q: As a long snapper with little to do in some games, do you find yourself watching the game like a fan?

A: Yes, I’d say I’m the closest thing to a fan as a player. Specialists do not really have a bias or bias. We just take it for what it is. I guess we have a little bias towards the offense because they determine whether we clear or kick a basket. I would say that the specialists have a good view of things as a whole.

Q: What would be the success for the team and for you individually this season?

A: For the team, I would say a national championship would obviously be a success. Coming together as a team, I think it would be a successful season, whatever that looks like. Finishing every game, knowing that we left everything there, would be a successful season. But also me just doing my job… I never want to stop us from not winning a game or hurting the team. As long as I don’t do it, I consider it a success.

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